Archive for April, 2009

Happy Good Friday

Friday, April 10th, 2009

Happy Good Friday

So I woke up this morning feeling inspired and I do not know if it has to do with the weather or whether I slept very well last night, well I actually slept 4 hours but still it was the best.

I felt like writing early this morning and so I did, I will deliver a few of things I wrote over the next couple days.

Today I began reviewing my Mass Control 2.0 Course and was going through some of the notes. I found myself jumping from that after about an hour or so, back into reviewing 4 Hour Work Week and recently received an email about the 4 hour Work Month. 

Funny how sometimes you review things and find yourself jumping from task to task and always tell yourself you getting things done. Well do you really get things done?

I really do wonder about that sometimes, considering that me, myself I am lazy but productive at times and other times I procrastinate. I find myself lately really thinking am I where want to be at in my life and of course the answer is very immediate, no I am NOT.

The next question am I Happy? Yes, I am happy.

 What am I happy about?

This question could be a number of things and is always asked to me because I am always in good spirits, at least that’s what everyone believes. I am happy to be alive, healthy, able to enjoy myself at times and educate myself, network with some good people in the world and always meeting new people.

I am motivated about a lot of different things, will not get into that at this moment and time.

But just realize if you have passions, focus, vision, willing to invest in yourself and patience and also the willingness to work with others, things will help motivate you as well.

Enjoy your Good Friday, may you spend however you like, either with your family, your friends and or significant other. Call them to say hello if you are not around them. I always call my family at least twice a week.

Well until my next post.

All the best,

Julio R. Mattos

Billionaire Clusters

Friday, April 10th, 2009

Billionaire Clusters

by Duncan Greenberg
Wednesday, April 1, 2009
provided by

Want to become a billionaire? Up your chances by dropping out of college, working at Goldman Sachs or joining Skull & Bones.

Are billionaires born or made? What are the common attributes among the uber-wealthy? Are there any true secrets of the self-made?

More from Forbes.com:

• In Depth: Billionaire Clusters

• The 2009 Billionaire List

• The Next Billionaire Boom

We get these questions a lot, and decided it was time to go beyond the broad answers of smarts, ambition and luck by sorting through our database of wealthy individuals in search of bona fide trends. We analyzed everything from the billionaires’ parents’ professions to where they went to school, their track records in the early stages of their careers and other experiences that may have put them on the path to extreme wealth.

Our admittedly unscientific study of the 657 self-made billionaires we counted in February for our list of the World’s Billionaires yielded some interesting results.

First, a significant percentage of billionaires had parents with a high aptitude for math. The ability to crunch numbers is crucial to becoming a billionaire, and mathematical prowess is hereditary. Some of the most common professions among the parents of American billionaires (for whom we could find the information) were engineer, accountant and small-business owner.

More from Yahoo! Finance:

• More People Are Ditching or Torching Their Cars for Cash

• Lost Your Job? Get Refunds on Cars, Travel

• 7 Things You’re Wasting Money On


Visit the Family & Home Center

Consistent with the rest of the population, more American billionaires were born in the fall than in any other season. However, relatively few billionaires were born in December, traditionally the month with the eighth highest birth rate. This anomaly holds true among billionaires in the U.S. and abroad.

More than 20% of the 292 of the self-made American billionaires on the most recent list of the World’s Billionaires have either never started or never completed college. This is especially true of those destined for careers as technology entrepreneurs: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Michael Dell, Larry Ellison, and Theodore Waitt.

Billionaires who derive their fortunes from finance make up one of the most highly educated sub-groups: More than 55% of them have graduate degrees. Nearly 90% of those with M.B.A.s obtained their master’s degree from one of three Ivy League schools: Harvard, Columbia or U. Penn’s Wharton School of Business.

Goldman Sachs has attracted a large share of hungry minds that went on to garner 10-figure fortunes. At least 11 current and recent billionaire financiers worked at Goldman early in their careers, including Edward Lampert, Daniel Och, Tom Steyer and Richard Perry.

Several billionaires suffered a bitter professional setback early in their careers that heightened their fear of failure. Pharmaceutical tycoon R.J. Kirk’s first venture was a flop–an experience he regrets but appreciates. “Failure early on is a necessary condition for success, though not a sufficient one,” he told Forbes in 2007.

According to a statement read by Phil Falcone during a congressional hearing in November, his botched buyout of a company in Newark in the early 1990s taught him “several valuable lessons that have had a profound impact upon my success as a hedge fund manager.”

Several current and former billionaires rounded out their Yale careers as members of Skull and Bones, the secret society portrayed with enigmatic relish by Hollywood in movies like The Skulls and W. Among those who were inducted: investor Edward Lampert, Blackstone co-founder Steven Schwarzman, and FedEx founder Frederick Smith.

Parents Had Math-Related Careers

The ability to crunch numbers is normally a key to becoming a billionaire. Often, mathematical prowess is hereditary. Some of the most common professions among the parents of American billionaires for whom we could find that information were engineer, accountant and small-business owner.

September Birthdays

Of the 380 self-made American tycoons who have appeared on the Forbes list of the World’s Billionaires in the past three years, 42 were born in September–more than in any other month. Maybe that’s because September is the month the Forbes list of the 400 richest Americans is published.

Tech Titans Who Dropped Out of College

Forget everything your guidance counselor told you: You don’t have to go to college to be successful. More than 20% of the self-made American moguls on the most recent list of the World’s Billionaires never finished college. Many of them made their fortunes in tech. Among them: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Michael Dell, Larry Ellison, (Oracle) and Theodore Waitt (Gateway).

Skull and Bones

Several current and former billionaires rounded out their Yale careers as members of Skull and Bones, the secret society portrayed with enigmatic relish by Hollywood in movies like The Skulls and W. Among those who were inducted: investor Edward Lampert, Blackstone co-founder Steven Schwarzman and FedEx founder Frederick Smith.

Goldman Sachs

A stint at investment bank Goldman Sachs is a prime credential for becoming a finance billionaire. Of the 68 self-made American billionaires that derive their fortunes from finance, at least eight cut their teeth in Goldman’s investment banking, trading, or asset management divisions. The company’s crown jewel: its “risk arbitrage” unit, which launched the careers of billionaires Edward Lampert and Daniel Och, as well as former billionaires Tom Steyer and Richard

When the Going Gets Tough …Fire Your CEO First!

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

When the Going Gets Tough …Fire Your CEO First!

Dear Business-Builder,

When someone asks, “What do you do for a living?” there is only one correct answer.

It’s not, “I have a business.”  A business is something you own; not something you do.

It’s not “I’m a doctor.”  That’s just a profession – not what really pays the bills.

And it’s sure not, “I give investment advice.”  Or, “I do landscaping.”  Or, “I dry-clean clothes.”  Or, “I write sales copy.”  Those are just the products and services you sell.

The only correct answer to this most common cocktail-party question is to declare loudly and proudly …

“I’m a marketer!”

“My specialty is attracting new customers … persuading existing customers to make ever-larger purchases … convincing them to buy more often … and making sure they keep buying from me forever.”

I’m not quibbling here; the point I’m making is a crucial one.  Because your answer to the “What do you do?” question says a lot about how you think about your business or career. 

And as long as you define yourself by what you own or by the sheepskin on your wall or by the product or service you sell – as long as you define yourself as anything but a marketer – you are setting yourself up to make huge mistakes in how you run your business that will limit your success.

Because every business and every non-profit organization is first and foremost a marketing enterprise.  Because nothing happens until the cash register rings.

So it amazes me that so many marketers structure their companies upside-down:  With MBAs, bean-counters and lawyers at the top and marketers forced to beg for resources.

In good times that’s a bad idea.  In bad times, it’s idiotic.

We’re now staring down the barrel of the worst holiday season in decades.  With unemployment surging, wary consumers are pinching their pennies, avoiding all but essential expenses.  And all around the globe, businesses are cutting costs like there’s no tomorrow.

But cost-cutting is only half of the equation.  In times like these, companies that find ways to introduce new efficiencies into their business process are most likely to survive.  And that means we can no longer afford to elevate bureaucrats and relegate the marketing department to second-place.

In times like these, we don’t need CEOs.  We need CMOs — Chief MARKETING Officers — running our companies:  People who make sure that attracting new customers, selling more to each customer and keeping customers buying longer are the top priorities of every employee — from the business owner right on down to the janitor. 

Nor do we need budgets that restrict the amount of testing marketers are able to do — we need spending mandates that empower marketers to run every good idea up the flagpole to see how many prospects and customers salute.

My advice:  If you own a business or work for one, read this.  Then, read this.  Then, marshal the troops this week to brainstorm what you should be doing right now to put marketing first.

I’ll predict that one meeting will do more to help your company or your clients’ companies thrive than anything else you could possibly do this week.

Yours for Bigger Winners, More Often,
Clayton Makepeace Signature
Clayton Makepeace
Publisher & Editor
THE TOTAL PACKAGE

http://www.makepeacetotalpackage.com

This is an awesome article for some of us to use and but a lot of people still do not understand, they still prefer fancy titles over what you actually do and what industry you are in and also by how money you make. Remember we are all in marketing no matter what one may say and no matter how far you claim you are not, you really are.

Brought to you by Julio Mattos